House Arrest

It’s the fourth day of my house arrest. I started counting from Monday, where I first took a sick leave. I am very grateful that there’s Internet, or else I’d be bored silly. I’m also thankful that even though it’s my eye that’s infected, I can still use it. I have a cousin who occasionally get severe eye allergy and he literally is blind for a few days.

“It’s tough not to be able see, Ate,” he told me the last time he had this allergy attack. “You can’t read, you can’t watch TV, you can’t play video games. There’s music to listen to but that’s still not much.” True indeed. If I played a musical instrument it would be fine, I suppose. But my guitar lacks a string and there’s only so much I can play without resorting to chords.

I’m not making much sense now, am I?

This eye virus/infection is really something. I am not really sick, meaning I don’t have any fever or anything that renders me physically incapable of getting out, going to work and doing my job. However, it’s the kind of illness that makes you stay home because it’s quite contagious, and it doesn’t look pretty. I’ve gone through several rolls of tissue because it’s like I’m crying all the time. *sigh*

Anyway, I’m off to the doctor. My youngest brother Dion said that it’s healing how since I’m “crying” all the time. I’ll be glad to get rid of this. While getting some rest is nice, I’d like to go back to my regular schedule.

Update
Just go back from the clinic. I went to Medical City at SM Marikina and the doctor who attended to me was Dr. Jaime P. Capco. He said that while the problem with my eye is not contagious (so you don’t have to run when you see me people), it is caused by a bacterial. He had me do some tests (which proved that my eyesight is still pretty good) and said that I need two medicines: one to drop on my eye and the other to take orally to fight the bacteria. I can go out and work, he said, but I’d better take some precaution to protect my eyes. If by Saturday it’s still like this, I have to go back and see him.

I hope the medicines will take effect ASAP. As nice as the doctor was, I don’t want to see him again, and I mean that in a good way. 🙂

Quezon Day 2010

Quezon day today, so that means I’m on holiday. I initially thought about being lazy at home but I went to Ortigas to meet with Ching and Presea. Ching was starting on a new job near Megamall so that was where we met. Lunch of Bodhi (wish there was one in Eastwood), dessert of ice scramble.

Didn’t do much after that. We went to National Bookstore so both can look at things they needed. I perused the book sale pile and found none to my liking. Since they had to go back, I walked with them to Building B. I decided to pass by the Body Shop to check out the price of the perfume I liked, but was sidelined by Chapters & Pages.

While sometimes more expensive than Booksale, I do love their “Buy One Take One” section. There I found some interesting books. For P99, I got two new reads: “He’s Just Not That Into You” by Greg Behrendt and Liz Tucceillo, and “A Girls’ Guide to Hunting and Fishing” by Melissa Bank.

It was inevitable that I pass by Booksale on my way back to Building A, where I found a hardback edition of Mary Balogh’s “Simply Dangerous” for P125, by far the most expensive book I got for the day. A Jude Deveraux hardback released late last year was also available but since I stopped reading her works (medyo boring na), I passed it up.

Since I was on a roll, I thought I’d say hello to Powerbooks na din, because sometimes they have this most amazing sale pile where I get a lot of cool books. A few minutes of looking and digging netted me two books from the “Once Upon A Time” series I’m collecting: “Sunlight and Shadow” by Cameron Dokey, and “The Crimson Thread” by Suzanne Weyn. Both books were at 50% off and I got them at 60% when I purchased a bookmark for P15. Yeeeha.


Booksale

Powerbooks

Today’s book haul for only P400+

I took the train to Cubao afterwards to pick up my sister who spent the past few days in Zambales. She had a lot of things with her, namely a giant pizza and a giant burger from Xtremely Xpresso in SBMA, much like the one we had before. It was my siblings’ first time to try it, and they were overwhelmed. Thanks to my mom & dad for buying it, and my sister for carrying it all the way from Olongapo!

Capped off the day with a short swim, then dinner of my share of the giant burger (which was already good as one Quarter Pounder), then wrote this entry.

Work tomorrow, but I feel good about it.

Photo dump after the cut. Click “Read more” below!


Cute doggie in the pet store


Taking the giant pizza home


Taxi meter with receipt!


Dig in!


Giant burger


Quiet afternoon


Flowers

Also, I started watching “Katanagatari”, on the recommendation of my friend SushiChef. So far it’s a pretty good watch. I like the art and the costumes. The story is taking its time but I like the premise. It’s supposed to run for 12 episodes (started last January) and will air only one episode a month.


Still pretty cute though. 🙂

Candelaria again

In Candelaria now. Left Manila last night around 8:30. It had started to rain and continued up until we passed Pampanga. It was raining in some parts of Zambales too. I didn’t get to see much of Botolan, but from what I was able to catch a glimpse of, well, let’s just say that it won’t be the same. There were entire stretches where the only light was from the bus and street lamps. The houses were all dark.

My trip was fast, surprisingly. I expected to be in Candelaria by 2:30 at the earliest, but I was home by 1:30. Most night trips tend to be much faster than day trips. Thanks to manong driver for taking me home safe.

Thursday, I was in Baguio. Ching & I went to get some documents and met up with our college professors for our recommendations. It was great to hang out with them, catching up and joking. Sitting at the Inquirer office brought back my internship days.

We went back to Manila that same day. Tiring, but fun.

Tomorrow, we will go to the cemetery. Next week, Mama & Papa will work with some of their friends for a relief drive to Botolan. They said there were many families who still need help, and none are able to reach them. I hope I could come along and see how it goes.

Sunday, September 13

IMG_0045

Some people see this flower as a weed, but I find it rather charming, especially since a lot of its kind would grow around my grandparents’ house. I don’t know it’s name, but it has always been there.

Online reunion
I added my godfather on Facebook, and we chatted a bit early today. He thought I wouldn’t remember him anymore. I surprised him by not only knowing who he was, but talking about his house, his family and other things that I do remember. They left for the U.S. when I was around 7.

Health
Feel a bit under the weather. I now have the sniffles and cough.

Family
Happy birthday to my wonderful mom. I love you. 🙂 I think FEU’s win was a nice present for you.

UP Baguio Homecoming 2008 Part 2

Read UP Baguio Homecoming Part 1

Lunch
Alumni trooped to the Bulwagang Juan Luna for lunch. There was a program where TABAK did their trademark performance of a day in the life of Juana de la Cruz, bringing back memories of freshman year and various presentations over the years. It was also nice to see some of the alumni joining the presentation.

After lunch, the older alumni had an informal program of sorts where they introduced themselves and updated each other of what they were doing now. During the “roll call” of graduates, we were the youngest, having graduated in 2000’s, while there were graduated from the 80s and up.

We younger alumni listened and just had fun. I felt that we were too young to share anything yet, maybe in five years. Still, it was great to see them, learn about who they are and watch them reminisce about their days in UP Baguio. It was also a learning experience of sorts because you get to hear about how UP was before and what had changed. Everyone seemed to have something to share and that made it really interesting.

Someone was able to identify the picture of UPB faculty that was posted on sayoterepublic before. I only recognized two, and when we learned that one of them was Sir Delfin Tolentino, you could hear the people in our table gasp in surprised amusement.

Towards the end, one alumnus led a rousing rendition of UP Naming Mahal, but it was the English version (the one my grandfather knows). We also heard our manongs from Batch 60+ share a cheer they had way back then.

My batchmates and I were in fangirl (and guys, I guess hehe) spasms with Kidlat Tahimik sitting on the table next to ours. I was really thrilled because he had Sir Rolly and Sir Jawo there too. When they were finished eating, we snagged them for a photo. Priceless!

I finally met Kidlat Tahimik when he went around, asking people to sign the petition against the commercialization of the forest next to the Convention Center. He’s nice, and quite funny too. We saw him around the campus for the rest of the day, and chatted with him too. Got to chat with his wife too, and their youngest, Kabunyan, was also there.

Tambay
We spent the afternoon just hanging around the “park”, as we called it. Later on, Thet and I went around the campus. I haven’t been to the new College of Arts and Communications building, or the Social Sciences, so we went there.

It’s interesting to note that the CAC and CSS are now at the “bottom”. What was the FA and Court B is now the CAC building, and the HS/Math division is now the CSS. I was admiring the CSS building and even the comfort room, when I spied a tree that looked very familiar. Stepping out, I realized that it was one of the trees we used to hold on to when we’d go down to Court B. As amazed as I was with the new buildings, I can’t help but feel a bit of sadness for the loss of some of the places we used to hang around in. You could even see the lines of the volleyball court.

And I can’t get over the fact that the Mass Comm kids had these brand spanking new equipment that my batchmates and I could only dream of back then. Several batches would have to compete over two V8 video cameras and be creative in taking shots because that was all we had. Nowadays, they had HD cameras with boom mikes, a control for those cameras to switch views etc. No need to rent from outside huh? Lupit!

Thet and I went into the library, still manned mainly by the same people. It didn’t really seem to have changed much, though some of the chairs were now monoblocks instead of the big, wooden chairs that were surprisingly comfortable.

I wanted to ask if I could see my thesis (a copy of which I don’t have), but no one was around the reserved area and I wasn’t sure if I had to go through the usual procedure of getting it (do you guys still remember how to?). So Thet and I went to the second floor and had our pictures taken among the bookshelves. Yay, pasaway.

I tried looking for any of the books that I used to borrow, hoping perhaps that the card there would still contain my name. Unfortunately, I wasn’t successful.

I did see some new books, which was cool. Still, on the overall, it didn’t look like the library changed much. I would’ve loved to sit at the very back and sleep read like I used to.

More friends
Towards the later part of the afternoon, we were debating on whether we’d go join the Torch Parade or just hang around at the campus. Tiki relived his days as SC Chair (2000-2001) by calling for people to join the parade. For some reason, the student who was supposed to do it had an attack of shyness, so Tiki stepped in.

Thet and I went to take some pictures, after we decided to stay behind. On our way to the Oble, someone called my name. Turning, I saw my blockmate Honey, I immediately gave her a big hug, then included Thet in it. We almost got run over by a car too. Then, Honey turned to someone behind her and said, “Eto pa isa o.” I saw Kim (whom Onats christened Kabute way back then), another blockmate and good friend. I would’ve screeched again, had it not been for the baby she was holding. Instead, I carefully hugged her as so not to squash little Raquim (I don’t know the correct spelling though). Since we were not joining the parade, we decided to head back to the booth, took pictures and talked.

Kim had to leave a little later, but before she did, she introduced me to a girl who happened to be the younger sister of our blockmate Masikap. Masi was one of the few who went to Diliman during our second year, and we somehow lost touch over the years. I asked his sister about him and told her to give him my regards.

Our classmate Migs Canilao also dropped by with his brods. I dubbed our photo as a Korean telenovela cast shot of sorts.

Early Pasiklaban?
The sun had set by the time the parade started. I originally planned to just take pictures as they left the campus, but the lure of the festive atmosphere was too strong to pass up. So I said goodbye to Thet and joined the other alumni who were there.

The walk wasn’t bad because there were plenty of people. The air was chilly and invigorating, coupled with the good humor of the alumni made it a lot fun. There were a few marshals, who looked to be part of the student council. They were giving us instructions on where to go and we jokingly replied, “We know what to do!”

It was good fun.

Since we were at the head of the line, we had to wait a bit before the Oblation Run and the fireworks. I went back to the booth to rest. Turns out our location was ideal because the participants for the Oblation Run would pass behind us. I literally ran with them to the crowd waiting at the Oble grounds.

The spot I got was right behind Oble, next to a few people for whom this was their first time, based on their comments and their shrieks. I stayed put for the fireworks, and with my handy Ixus, took shots of Oble’s silhouette as the sky was lit up. Nice.

There were more people during the dinner, alumni and their families who had just arrived, along with currents students who joined in on the festivities. Kat said later that the number of attendees were way beyond the expected, much to the delight of Ma’am Costina. The audi was so packed; many had to eat their dinners outside. Registration was halted because there were just too many people. Still, that didn’t stop everyone from having a good time.

For the dinner program, it was the alumni who shared their talents to the crowd. Among the night’s entertainment were performances from faculty of the various colleges, a reading of “The Vagina Monologues” from various faculty and alumni (including Ma’am Costina and Angel Aquino), a hula dance number from TAYAW alumni and a very lively performance from Kidlat Tahimik.

The program lasted well into the night, capped by a singing of UP Naming Mahal. We cleaned up our booth and headed home, though I have a feeling that many of the others didn’t go to sleep until the wee hours of the morning.

Day 2
I went with my sister Otki to school. I introduced her to my friends, then had brunch at the Upper Canteen. Afterwards, I took her around the campus and visited the Human Kinetics Program building. As amazed as I am with the building, I couldn’t help but feel a bit sad that the archery range is gone. There was a small area inside for shooting, but it wasn’t quite the same.

I couldn’t help wonder if they found our lost arrows when they dug up the ground next to the range. If you find any arrows with a pink fletch, that’s mine.
We didn’t do much, and we didn’t really spend it at campus either. We visited Manang Mane and bought our favorite mangga’t bagoon. No price increase! We also visited the student council office, with Tiki and Jang reminiscing about how it was like and how things have changed.

I got to talk to Sir Francis Macansantos, who was my professor in Comm 10. He may not fully remember my name, but he remembered me as the student who loved anime. Well, that counts for something, hehe. He recently won a Palanca, and he told me to go ahead and submit something. Nothing to lose, he said, and you’ll never know.

One last trip around the campus with my sister, while telling stories of what I used to do here and there, then we broke for lunch.

I didn’t get to go back to the campus after that, but spent the rest of the day walking around Session and experiencing the Baguio nightlife (which I never really got to do in college).

Kat said it in her blog entry. We all fell in love with Baguio all over again. In a time when it’s getting overly crowded, these few days of fun in UP made me remember why I love it, and why I didn’t move to Diliman in the first place. It was great to spend time with my friends, and see people who were in UPB way before I was even old enough to realize there was a UP in Baguio.

2011 is UP Baguio’s 50th anniversary. Plans of another homecoming is in the works. Hopefully, my batchmates will be able to go (hint, hint).

Whew, that was long! For the rest of the pictures, you can check them out here, or at my Multiply.

UP Baguio Homecoming 2008

I probably am one of the few people who passed the UPCAT never got the typical “congratulations” acceptance letter. Instead, mine read “Due to the planned expansion of UP College Baguio…” and was told I can enroll in any course, except Com Sci.

I’ve yet to meet anyone who has the same type of letter that I did.

I went back to UP Baguio a few weeks ago, to get a copies of my diploma and transcript authenticated. I had seen some familiar people, met with a few of my former mentors and gone around the campus just to see how things have changed.

As interesting an experience that was, it was far more exhilarating to actually be in UP Baguio with your friends and classmates and be surrounded by familiar people, bringing in memories of the great times you had when you were still in school. In that weekend, I was called ading by many of the admin and staff, and I felt like a freshman once again, mostly due to the fact the buildings were all so new… and the fact that I saw a lot of my upperclassmen (the seniors and up when I was a freshman).

In the words of Ma’am Macansantos when she gave her speech during the lunch program, “Welcome home.”

Welcome home indeed.

Day 1: Friday
I arrived around 7 AM in Baguio of December 5. I took a day’s leave from work and got the 1 AM trip from Manila. Initially, I didn’t want to go because I felt that I was the only one who will be there. Somehow, at the last minute, I changed my mind and decided to go, even if my batch’s attendance would be small.

I dropped my things off at my sister’s dorm (who was also studying in Baguio) and slept for approximately an hour. I met her later for breakfast (almost getting lost because I didn’t know there was a Jollibee in Assumption Road) then headed to UP. Baguio has changed a lot, but in some way, it hasn’t changed at all.

The atmosphere was festive. Students were milling about the campus, probably preparing for the activities later in the afternoon, or perhaps doing their projects and other requirements before Christmas vacation rolls in.

I headed towards the lobby, hoping to spot anyone that I know. I was about an hour early in meeting my friends, and I wasn’t fond of the idea of going around on my own.

I saw Ma’am Vicky Costina talking with a few of the staff about the registration tables. I saw several people in similar shirts, taking pictures, and talking. I figured they were alumni from years before I went to UP. Then, I heard a loud voice talking and when I turned to look, I saw Ma’am Claur. I couldn’t help but smile at her, remembering how intimidated I was during PE 1 (which we call fondly called Bio 1). She was talking to another alumnus, and rude as it may seem, I just stood there watching them. In my mind’s eye, she looked thinner than she did before, but on the whole, she looked the same.

Finally, my friends arrived. I think it was ok to greet them with shrieks and hugs, after all, it had been years since we last saw each other… well, years for my blockmate Thet and myself, though I saw Kat, Jang and Tiki sometime before.

We were among the first to register for the homecoming (I was #13 haha), so we were still able to choose our shirt sizes. We milled around the lobby for a bit, and saw the arrival of more familiar faces: Ma’am Helen from the clinic (retired now, and with whom I chatted with briefly about the many changes around the campus), Ma’am Brawner (my archery mentor and the team’s kakulitan during practice), and a few upperclassmen.

Afterwards we helped Tiki set-up a table for the memorabilia he was selling. We got a table from Ma’am Costina at the OPA office and found a good spot in front of the audi. There were a lot of people milling around waiting for the opening of the “Pagpupugay kay Sir Darnay” art exhibit.

My friends and I took that time to take pictures. I was sad that there were only four of us from our batch’s division (uy, college na siya ngayon!), but decided to make the most of it. Later, we found a few more batchmates from the Social Scienes and Nat Sci division, er, colleges.

We really didn’t do anything much except hang around, do some catching up and take pictures. Manang Mane came by and we just had to pose with her. Then I heard someone say “Sir Rolly” and saw him coming from the lobby. I’m sorry, I couldn’t help it. I literally jumped out of my chair, raised my arms and screeched “Sir Rolly!” I immediately corralled him for a picture with Thet, Kat and myself. I think I was hyperventilating. Oh well, that was heaps better than the last time I saw him, where I was so tongue-tied I could only grin at him idiotically.

Of course, we also tried to sell the memorabilia and chatted with a few of the alumni. It was cool to see the turnout from the earlier batches, and I was even more amazed when I spied a man who came from Class 1967! He was by his lonesome, which I thought was sad, but later on, he was with a few other people who were his friends back then. Cool.

Read on “UP Baguio Homecoming 2008: Part 2”