Tag Archives: up diliman

First Impressions: MLIS

I’m done with the first days of my classes. Course outlines have been handed out, and reporting duties have been assigned. In all of my classes, my reports won’t be until September. Right now I’m feeling pretty mellow, but I know that once August rolls in I’ll be in a rush. So I should start doing research now (especially for my LIS 201 class, which I am determined to ace). Continue reading

Huling hirit

Summer was still in full swing when Ryan broached the idea of having a picnic-slash-toy shoot at UP Diliman. Unfortunately, our schedules were full that it wasn’t until last Sunday were we able to finally get together. It had rained the days before so we were worried that it might rain on that weekend. Thankfully, the sun was bright and shining, so our picnic plans pushed through.

Joiz, Ryan, Drew and I agreed to meet around 11:30 at Quezon Hall, Oblation. Unfortunately, we all had a mishap or two so we all met up around 1 PM. Joiz brought sandwiches, Ryan had brownies, I got Ilocos Empanada and Drew took care of the drinks. We made our way from Quezon Hall up to the Sunken Garden. Despite the shade of the trees, it was still warm. Later, I learned that June 4 was recorded to be the second hottest day in Manila this 2011. No wonder we were sweating.

So the afternoon was spent eating, drinking (softdrinks and water lang hehe), talking and taking pictures of our toys. Yes, that was a must. We watched a friendly soccer game between folks of two different nationalities, and pretty much just lazed the day away. When the day was ending, we went back to Quezon Hall to take pictures of Oblation, then headed to SM North to cool off.

Last hurrah before the rainy season hits, and how wonderfully timed it was.

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Getting the ball rolling

I haven’t picked up a paintbrush and did some serious painting in a long time. The stuff I did recently was similar to sketches. Now I know some folks would say that it’s better than doing nothing, but given that I’m the type who wants to do serious pieces, the little bits were really not much (sorry if that confused you).

I had been meaning to sign up for art classes, but so far the ones I saw were either really expensive or didn’t appeal to me at all. I was hoping for some summer weekend classes around QC or Ortigas, but no luck. A random visit to the UP CFA site showed a schedule of art workshops for April and May. Basic drawing, oils, acrylic and watercolor for P5,000. You can imagine my glee at this.

Unfortunately, I missed the first two, so I had the option of taking acrylic or watercolor. I decided to take the latter mostly because I couldn’t file VL at so short a notice for the acrylic class.

I eagerly signed up, and excitedly went to buy my art supplies. I technically had a couple of the ones on the list, but I decided to get some new ones. I got new paintbrushes (loving my Sakura 2 and 1 brushes), new paints, paper and so on.

I wasn’t quite sure what my expectations were. In most art classes I’ve taken in the past (both for summer and for school), we usually start off with a lecture on color theory and basic strokes and stuff. For this class, we only had a quick diagnostic sketch, then dived straight into painting.

Having previous experience with watercolor and how it works (behavior, mixing, application etc.), I didn’t have much of a problem. My problem was that I was mostly a theoretical painter: I’ve read a lot on how this is, how that is, what this technique does and so on, but I’ve yet to try it because I was so scared to fail.

Which is the main reason why I wanted to take art classes. I’ve still got a lot to learn despite my familiarity, but Im quite nervous to start. So I really appreciated the heads on style, rather than the classroom lecture most of the other attendees were expecting. It’s pretty much the same way I learned how to use Photoshop and HTML: I look for the specific task/effect I wanted, then learn the process. I pick up techniques along the way.

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Our instructor was chatty. He reminded me of a dentist in the way that he’d talk to us about all sorts of things while we’re deeply concentrated with our work. He’d offer us advice during our progress. A distraction, but sometimes welcome.

This was our process: Prepare the canvas by cutting the paper, mounting it to the board, then soak. Let it dry then sketch the subject, then paint it per section. I didn’t think I can do it, but slowly but surely, I was able to get it. Sure I made mistakes, but I had fun doing them. The painting isn’t really done, but it’s very close to. I plan to finish it this month. I don’t know what I’ll do next, but I’m happy to know that I can do it if I wanted to. 🙂

P.S. I really love hanging out a UPD. I want to study again!

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UP Naming Mahal talaga

UP Diliman Oblation

UP exam results bring joy, anguish to applicants

Ah, it’s that time of the year again.

I remember when I was applying for UP. I had used up several copies of the application form because I wanted mine to be clean. I also spent a lot of time talking with my mother about what course to pick. She told me to choose accounting, especially since then, I had planned to take up law afterwards. My choices ended up as thus: UP Diliman as the first campus of choice, with Accounting and Journalism as the courses, then UP Baguio with Com Sci and Journalism as my courses.

When the results were released, it was my best friend’s older sister, then a freshman in UPD, who looked for our names. Sadly, she told us that we weren’t on the list. I felt grim at the prospect of going to school in Miriam (no offense meant. It’s just that my mindset has been on UP for so long), as that and DLSU were the two other schools whose entrance exams I passed (I didn’t make it in Ateneo), and goodness knows we couldn’t afford DLSU.

One day, near the end of senior year, I arrived home from school and my tita said, “May sulat ka galing UP.” (You have a letter from UP). Nervous, I took my time opening it. It was a thin, legal sized, dirty white envelope. I was expecting a rejection letter, because what else could it contain? My acceptance letters from Miriam and DLSU were really thick ones, containing information as to what I should do upon enrolment, so I wasn’t really excited to open this one.

Inside the envelope were several folded sheets of paper, mostly mimeographed ones. The single sheet of white paper had those perforated edges with holes in them, and that was the one I opened first.

I still laugh every time I remember those words, as it is probably the most unusual words one could ever read in an college acceptance letter. “Congratulations” would be the most typical. I, however, got this:

“Due to the planned expansion of UP College Baguio, you have been admitted…”

Long story short, I went to UP Baguio. I picked Journalism because… it was bound to have little or no math subjects. Ironically, the jobs I entered in after graduating were in the tech industry.

Regardless of the campus, studying in UP is an experience I will never ever trade for anything. And despite the differences of each campus, you know you’re still in UP when you visit one. I know that’s how I felt when I went to the Diliman, Manila, Los Baños and Visayas campuses.

Congratulations to the new batch of Isko and Iska. Study hard, but have fun as well.

P.S. Urban legend has it that when you have your photograph taken with the Oblation while you are still studying, you will not graduate. Not sure if this means “not graduating on time” or “not graduating at all.” Hehe.

Photography wan-oh-wan

Presea told me about a basic digital photography workshop she was going to attend. Given that the price is reasonable and the location good, I thought I’d give it a go as well.

The class was small, which was good because it allowed us to feel more at ease with our teacher James Nicolay (who really is a teacher by profession, rather than a photographer). The er, lesson was easy to understand. A bit overwhelming at first, perhaps, plus a little daunting when everyone else had a DSLR or at least a semi-pro camera.

Ego moment though, when I was told that I had a good eye for photos and should consider upgrading my camera (my ever lovely and reliable Canon Ixus 80 IS) soon.

Here’s the five photographs I submitted for critique, already edited and watermarked.

Carillon

Van

Carillon II

Leaf

Tin Tin

You can view the other photos here in my Flickr.

This class was very helpful in learning the basics of photography. Sure, I read books and tutorials but sometimes, the terminology and the text can be daunting. At least now I have a better idea of the technical side of photography and I’m also more familiar with my camera. I’m considering getting a DSLR sometime this year, but that’s all plans. Still, I had great fun and I’m more confident now with what I can do, photography wise.